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Sony Announces Prices for Blu-Ray DVD's


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This is one piece of tech I won't be buying into.. It's all a con to make us replace our movie collection AGAIN (Jeez.. I've only just managed to replace with DVD from VHS!!) Anyway the change in format is 'supposedly' because the discs are better quality.. but the industry themselves even state that there is no real difference in quality.

 

CON! CON! CON!

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The difference isn't in quality, it is in quantity. The single layer blu-ray discs hold 25 gigs a piece. That's over 2 hours of HD video, or about 13 hours of standard video. Imagine: an entire season of TNG on just 2 or 3 blu-ray discs.

 

Alas, I am a poor college student who cannot afford blu-ray technology... You'd think someone with experience in all Adobe programs, Macromedia Suite, PHP / SQL, and 3DS Max would be able to get a job real quick. All I need is that piece of paper they call a diploma!!!

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The difference isn't in quality, it is in quantity. The single layer blu-ray discs hold 25 gigs a piece. That's over 2 hours of HD video, or about 13 hours of standard video. Imagine: an entire season of TNG on just 2 or 3 blu-ray discs.

 

yeah, they are bigger because HD uses more capacity, so the reason for the switch is for the 'supposed' increase in quality, not just because they are bigger.

 

And you think because it'll be on less discs it'll cost less?? NO CHANCE, probably more in fact.. or is it simply capacity that make it attractive? (that's not a very good reason for upgrade) BTW: as I already stated (and this is from industry) the quality difference is negligable, definately not worth buying all new (more expensive) equipment. I've seen HD and DVD side by side and there is honestly very little difference (unless you get anal about it) and no difference at all unless you have an HD TV setup.

 

I hope you also realise that you CANNOT upgrade the quality of existing video footage just by re-encoding them with an HD codec... HD quality footage can only be obtained by the use of HD camera, so any existing film/tv is going to be the same quality as from DVD (or the original source) even if the original source is digital.

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Hmm that means probably close to $30 or more for a new release movie, on Blu Ray. Think about it, standard dvd movies that are just release these days are between $21-25 at the lowest price store in America. Ocassionally you can nab them for $15-18 the first few days they are released as part of a sale but after that they tend to go back to full price.

 

Now look at the Blu Ray pricing. Welcome to the next generation of pricing. Sure eventually when or I should say IF blu ray becomes the standard, the hardware will be cheap. The software (the dvds) won't be. I mean I can run out now and buy a very nice brand name dvd player for $80. Yet for many tv shows, I can't afford a single season for $80 o_O.

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I sure the industry won't charge any less for new movies than today (safe assumption).

 

I do belive we're going to see compromizes on quality vs. quantity. Like new releases of old non-HD movie bundels on one or two disc and complete season or entier collections on a couple of discs. I won't be surprised if they release a complete collection of ST or any other show.

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Eh, they'll never do the bundle thing. I mean, at least not with stuff as big as Star Trek or as small and nice as Farscape. The more in-the-middle stuff like BSG or Stargate, yea they might. They did that for the X-Files, re-released it in a "slim case" edition, like 1/3 the normal price but minus most of the extras and in a less astehetically pleasing case.

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Is it just me, or do others see the REAL problem with this?

 

InPhase is due to release HVD later this year, offering a 200GB rewritable and a 300GB write once version, with plans to produce 1.2TB discs within 2 years.

 

Yes, that is TerraBytes, or one million megabytes, or one thousand gigabytes.

 

Seems kinda stupid to go get a 25 gig disc the size of a DVD or CD, when I will be able to get a 200-300GB disc later this year, and a 1.2TB disc in a couple of years.

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And you think because it'll be on less discs it'll cost less?? NO CHANCE, probably more in fact.. or is it simply capacity that make it attractive? ...

From a business standpoint, you are probably right.

 

I hope you also realise that you CANNOT upgrade the quality of existing video footage just by re-encoding them with an HD codec...

I hope you also realize that I am a multimedia technologies major (the 1st quarter students know that, sheesh) . Same concept as you cannot increase the resolution of a raster image without causing artifacting.

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Seems kinda stupid to go get a 25 gig disc the size of a DVD or CD' date=' when I will be able to get a 200-300GB disc later this year, and a 1.2TB disc in a couple of years.[/quote']

 

Because the cost of manufacturing HVD discs is astronomical. It's the same problem that plagues FVD.

Besides, everyone in the industry tends to side with Sony (HD was their idea). Whatever Sony says is best will sell. It's the way of the world.

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I think you are not quite gathering what an HVD is. Holographic Versitile Disc. At present, they are looking at a price of $120 per disc, and $15000 for the machine.

 

Yes, when it first comes out, it will be rather pricey, as it is designed to be sold first to IT departments as a quick way to back up their stuff. But, I seem to remember that there were CD tech going for about that at one time, and DVD tech going for about that, both when they first came out for computers.

 

And I was wrong about the planned capacity. In 2006, they are releasing a holographic card, similar to a compactflash card, able to hold 30GB, a 200GB rewritale, and a 300GB write once, with plans to have a 1.6TB disc avalible within 2 years.

 

Personaly, I see these blueray discs getting at best a home in extreme videophille's collections. By the time the average end user will be willing to spend the SERIOUS outlay for replacing their system and movies, HVD will be the new standard. Hell, we could have little compactflash card readers instead of those bulky disc drives for our movies!

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Nope, considering that when CD WORM drives came out, they were around the same price, dropping radically within 2 years to something most people could afford.

 

Also, the last time the music/movie industry agreed on ANYTHING was cassettes. For Video Tapes, you had the VHS/ BetaMax war, where BetaMax died, and VHS was king. You had Yellowbook and Redbook for CDs, Plus R and Dash R for DVD.

 

For the CD and DVD media, most manufacturers decided to go ahead and just support both into one unit. Yellowbook CDs were designated as audio CDs, and Redbook were the standard utility Cds. However, Yellowbook was pinched on by the RIAA, and a sneak tax was added to every blank Yellowbook CD. This is why you can find blank audio CDs that cost a lot more than the blank CDs for your computer.

 

Personally, I'd rather just get one standard. Requirements should be backwards compatability, allowing you to keep your current collections, and just add to them with the newer fare, instead of making them incompatable with the current technology and forcing people to buy the same bloody thing over and over again.

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One format is not good. That's what the consumer protection agency does here in the US. If there were but 1 format, chances are that 1 company would obtain exclusive rights and be capable of setting whatever price they want. Competition drives the price down. By the time the format war finishes, there will be a new couple of formats and it won't matter.

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Obviously a single format that a single company had the rights to would mean they could charge what they wanted but all the evidence I've heard suggests that "format wars" are bad for consumers and companies. Essentially because in wars, you have winners and losers and people end up putting money into a technological deadend.

 

You can't even say that it's survival of the fittest, Betamax was arguably a superior format to VHS but VHS managed to effectively bludgeon its way to the top.

 

Ultimately, if the industry acts in a rational fashion and all back a single format, everyone wins.

 

I agree with magestorm that backward compatibility should be a requirement but DVDs did offer a quantum leap from VHS.

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I think I read somewhere that hd-dvd might be able to play cd's and dvd's and hd-dvd's, while blue-ray would only be able to play dvd's and blue-ray disks. Copyprotections and restrictions would also be heavier on blue-ray and so would the programmable interface (java based, hd-dvd is xml based), so by all means hd-dvd is my favourite, it will also be cheaper in every way, and certainly for blanc discs. The error tolerance would also be better on hd-dvd. And the standard is constructed in a more uniform way.... In other words, as with most stuff Sony wishes to propagate, Blue-Ray sucks!!! Only benefit is about 25 gig on a single layer, but keeping in mind that hd-dvd does 15 and that holodisks are being developped too, I'd say we currently have no real need for those extra 10 gig if the price is going to be higher, since by the time the prices drop, holodisks will also start to become cheaper. HD-DVD is a good intermediate solution imo!

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